Code Coverage with JaCoCo

Code Coverage is a useful set of metrics that show you how much of your code you’re impacting during testing. It doesn’t say much about the quality of your tests (you can read more in the old post What is code coverage?), but a 30% coverage is definitely worse than 90%. Let’s see how we can use JaCoCo to see our code coverage in the Java world. We’ll check a few options to use it, such as using it manually, using it within a CI, breaking the build with it, etc. The assumption is we’re working with a Maven project.

Continue reading “Code Coverage with JaCoCo”

Code coverage for open source .NET with AppVeyor and Coveralls

Code coverage is a useful metric of the quality of your code. It shows how much code is being covered by unit tests. It doesn’t necessarily mean that the unit tests are well written, but no metric can probably tell you that. However, aiming for a specific code coverage, let’s say 70%, is a good practice, because failing to meet the goal might mean somebody didn’t write enough unit tests.

I’d like to have code coverage as part of the CI I had set up in a previous post with Travis. The bad news is that code coverage and Mono seem to be strangers. There is an open source module called monocov but I couldn’t get it to work. In fact in the homepage it says it’s not maintained. In my opinion, these kind of tools are essential and they should be included in the core Mono package. I hope they change this some day. Continue reading “Code coverage for open source .NET with AppVeyor and Coveralls”